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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 360-365

The relationship between fixed and rotating shifts with job burnout in nurses working in critical care areas


1 Department of Adult Health Nursing, Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Center, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Critical Care Nursing, Isfahan, Iran
3 Department of Critical Care Nursing, Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Mohsen Shahriari
Department of Adult Health Nursing, Nursing and Midwifery School, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Hezar JeribAvenue, Isfahan
Iran
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Source of Support: Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. This article was derived from an MSc thesis in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, No: 392011, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 25183975

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Background: While critical care nurses are vulnerable to burnout because of the complex nature of patients' health problems, working in critical care areas has become even more complicated by shift working schedules. This study aimed to determine the relationship between fixed and rotating shifts and burnout in a sample of critical care nurses working in critical care areas. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective cohort design, 170 critical care nurses from six selected hospitals were chosen using quota and random sampling and divided into two groups (exposed and non-exposed). Maslach Burnout Inventory was used for data collection and independent t-test and logistic regression was performed to analyze the data. Results: The mean scores of emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalization (DP) were significantly high in the non-exposed group, but the mean score of personal accomplishment (PA) had no significant difference in the two groups. Furthermore, the non-exposed group had 10.1 times the odds to expose to EE and 2.2 times the odds to expose to DP in comparison with the exposed group. High levels of burnout in the non-exposed group were 60%, 32.9%, and 27.1%, and in the exposed group were 12.9%, 18.8% and 43.5% in EE, DP and PA, respectively. Conclusions: The present study has revealed that critical care nurses with fixed shift schedules display more burnout compared to those working with rotating shift schedules.


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