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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 372-376

Patient safety culture in intensive care units from the perspective of nurses: A cross-sectional study


1 PhD Candidate of Nursing, Student Research Centre, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 MSc of Nursing, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Ph.D in Nursing, Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Centre, Department of Adult Health Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
4 MSc of Nursing, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran
5 PhD of Nutrition, Deputy for Treatment, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Saba Farzi
MSc of Nursing, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijnmr.IJNMR_150_16

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Background: One of the goals of nursing is providing safe care, prevention of injury, and health promotion of patients. Patient safety in intensive care units is threatened for various reasons. This study aimed to survey patient safety culture from the perspective of nurses in intensive care units. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016. Sampling was done using the convenience method. The sample consisted of 367 nurses working in intensive care units of teaching hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Data collection was performed using a two-part questionnaire that included demographic and hospital survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) questionnaire. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation). Results: Among the 12 dimensions of safety culture, the nurses assigned the highest score to “team work within units” (97.3%) and “Organizational learning-continuous improvement” (84%). They assigned the least score to “handoffs and transitions”(21.1%), “non-punitive response to errors” (24.7%), “Staffing” (35.6%), “Communication openness” (47.5%), and “Teamwork across units” (49.4%). Conclusions: The patient safety culture dimensions have low levels that require adequate attention and essential measures of health care centers including facilitating teamwork, providing adequate staff, and developing a checklist of handoffs and transitions. Furthermore, to increase reporting error and to promote a patient safety culture in intensive care units, some strategies should be adopted including a system-based approach to deal with the error.


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