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   Table of Contents      
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 573

Learning together matters: Interprofessional education to avoid medication errors


1 Lecturer, Maternal and Child Health Department, College of Nursing, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman
2 Lecturer, Fundamental and Administration Department, College of Nursing, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman
3 Staff Nurse and Team Leader, Antenatal OPD, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman

Date of Submission05-Dec-2020
Date of Decision03-Jan-2021
Date of Acceptance19-Apr-2021
Date of Web Publication22-Oct-2021

Correspondence Address:
Ms. Frincy Francis
Lecturer, Maternal and Child Health Department, College of Nursing, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat
Oman
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijnmr.IJNMR_363_20

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How to cite this article:
Francis F, Johnsunderraj SE, Prabhakaran H, Ramos Cayaban AR, Al Zahli RA. Learning together matters: Interprofessional education to avoid medication errors. Iranian J Nursing Midwifery Res 2021;26:573

How to cite this URL:
Francis F, Johnsunderraj SE, Prabhakaran H, Ramos Cayaban AR, Al Zahli RA. Learning together matters: Interprofessional education to avoid medication errors. Iranian J Nursing Midwifery Res [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Nov 27];26:573. Available from: https://www.ijnmrjournal.net/text.asp?2021/26/6/573/328912



Dear Editor,

Medication error occurs while committing mistakes in the steps from prescribing the medications to administering it, resulting in an adverse drug event.[1] Is the physician, the pharmacist, or the nurse being solely liable? No, it is an entire process involving the clinician who prescribes it, the pharmacist who delivers it, and the nurse who administers it. It is time to emphasize the importance of having a multiprofessional approach by embedding Interprofessional Education (IPE) models in the respective curriculums.[2]

Bringing together aspiring clinicians, pharmacists and nurses are essential, as training them in three different colleges may not give the students their role clarity in achieving medication safety. Redesigning curriculum with common learning platforms may help. Creating collaborative simulated environments with scenarios will help to instill self-awareness about their responsibilities and improve interdependence on each other.[2] Currently, scenarios are run by the same group of students assuming different roles but the impact would be higher if different health care professional students unite to learn together. IPE is better than single profession education.[3] To bridge the gap of feasibility issues in different curriculums, creating common learning courses with self-paced videos may benefit multiprofessional students in updating themselves. Organizing interprofessionally linked scholarly activities can help students be equally aware of Prescribing Principles including medical reconciliation. Transcribing specifically by computer entry to avoid handwriting errors. Dispensing by thorough checking by pharmacists and Administration by nurses adhering to medications rights.

Slightly riskier responsibility is being vested with the nurse who is directly involved in medication administration. Emphasis on strategies like Patient Identification with 3 V's: Verbalization, Visualization, and Verification, 3 checks of drug before administration with the second nurse, barcode checking in administration usage, watching out for signs of adverse drug reaction, patient and family education on drug safety. Nursing students should be trained for medication safety and administration under direct supervision of the clinical instructor. Working in collaboration, recognizing, and realizing one's own roles and responsibilities as healthcare team leads to lesser errors, improves teamwork thus safer for both patients and health care providers.[4]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

Nothing to declare.



 
  References Top

1.
Hayes C, Jackson D, Davidson P, Power T. Medication errors in hospitals: A literature review of disruptions to nursing practice during medication administration. J Clin Nurs 2015;24:3063-76.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Gilligan C, Outram S, Levett-Jones T. Recommendations from recent graduates in medicine, nursing and pharmacy on improving interprofessional education in university programs: A qualitative study. BMC Med Educ 2014;14:52.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Irajpour A, Farzi S, Saghaei M, Ravaghi H. Effect of interprofessional education of medication safety program on the medication error of physicians and nurses in the intensive care units. J Educ Health Promot 2019;8:196.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Motycka C, Egelund EF, Gannon J, Genuardi F, Gautam S, Stittsworth S, Young A, Simon L. Using interprofessional medication management simulations to impact student attitudes toward teamwork to prevent medication errors. Curr Pharm Teach Learn 2018;10:982-9.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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